Guide: Best Baseball Bat For 7 Year Old Kids

If you’ve ever tried to purchase a baseball bat for your 7-year-old child, you will agree that it’s not as easy a process as one might think, especially if it’s his first. No matter how well you think you know the game and its equipment, the various brands of bats, coupled with the regulations that guide youth leagues are bound to overwhelm you. The good news is that we are here to help.

 

In this guide, we will explain to you why size is the most important factor to consider. Of course, conventional wisdom requires you to choose a bat that is just the right size for your kid to handle with comfort. That said, size is not the only thing that should influence your judgment, so read on and learn all the factors that you should consider when purchasing this particular baseball bat.

Top 10 Best Baseball Bats For 7 Year Old

* editor rating based on quality and value
MODELOUR RATING
Easton MAKO TORQ Youth Baseball Bat
Easton MAKO TORQ Youth Baseball Bat
(4.9 / 5)
Combat Youth 2016 Maxum -12
Combat Youth 2016 Maxum -12
(5 / 5)
Louisville Slugger YBAR152 Youth 2015 Armor (-12)
Louisville Slugger YBAR152 Youth 2015 Armor (-12)
(4.9 / 5)
Easton MAKO COMPOSITE Youth Baseball Bat
Easton MAKO COMPOSITE Youth Baseball Bat
(5 / 5)
Louisville Slugger YBCT152 Youth 2015 Catalyst (-12)
Louisville Slugger YBCT152 Youth 2015 Catalyst (-12)
(4.9 / 5)
Easton 2015 SL15S110 S1 COMP 2 5/8-Inch -10
Easton 2015 SL15S110 S1 COMP 2 5/8-Inch -10
(4.9 / 5)
Easton S300 Youth Baseball Bat
Easton S300 Youth Baseball Bat
(4.8 / 5)
Easton S50 Youth Baseball Bat
Easton S50 Youth Baseball Bat
(4.8 / 5)
Easton S500 Youth Baseball Bat
Easton S500 Youth Baseball Bat
(4.8 / 5)
Marucci’s Cal Ripken Limited Edition
Marucci’s Cal Ripken Limited Edition
(4.9 / 5)

Size and Why It Matters

When it comes to baseball or softball, the size of the bat matters a lot, especially if your child is new to the game. The last thing you want is your child hitting one miss after another because you chose a bat whose size is not suitable for him. That will only work to demotivate him, and it won’t be long before he gives up on baseball entirely, no matter how passionate he was in the beginning.

Generally speaking, size covers length, width, and weight, but there is also the bat’s drop, which is the difference between its length and weight.

1. The Length

As far as length goes, the rule of thumb is that a 7-year-old should be able to swing a bat that measures 26 to 28 inches long comfortably. However, that ability varies depending on the child’s size (height and weight). Therefore, the best way to determine the most appropriate bat for your kids is to measure his height and weight and then use the following chart to choose the bat’s length.

Stick to that exact length if your child is a complete newbie. But if he has sufficient experience in baseball you can opt for a slightly longer bat because that way he will find it easier to reach balls that are pitched outside. In addition to that, his swing will have more power and acceleration.

But why not subject a beginner to the same advantages of a longer bat? Well, it’s pretty simple, a longer bat requires more energy and strength not only to swing but also to control. If your kid is a beginner, he might not have that strength yet.

2. The Width

When we say ‘width’ we are talking about the barrel’s width or diameter. A bat with a full width has a larger surface than one with a small one. The large surface will make it easier for your kid to hit the ball, and that means his misses will be few. However, bats with wide widths are heavy to swing, and that might compromise the child’s performance. To be on the safe side, choose a bat with a 2¼-inch barrel. After all, that is the recommended size for most youth leagues.

3. Weight

A heavier bat has more force and inertia and can, therefore, send the ball farther. That said, if it is too heavy for your kid it can slow down his swing and thus decrease his hitting power. On the other hand, a lighter bat will be easier to swing but won’t have sufficient power to send the ball far. Despite those two important points, you should know that a stronger kid will find it easier to swing a heavier bat than a kid who is not strong.

So, how can you determine the ideal bat weight for your champ? First, measure his height and weight and then use the following figures to make your selection:

Player’s Height vs. Bat Weight

– If your kid’s height is 48–52 inches choose a bat that weighs 16-17 ounces
– For a kid of height 52-56 inches, choose a bat of weight 17-18 ounces
– For height 56-60 inches choose a bat of weight 18-19 ounces

Player’s Weight vs. Bat Weight

– If your kid’s weight is 80 lbs or less go for an 18-19 ounce bat
– For 80-100 lbs kid choose a 19-20 ounce bat
– For 100-120 lbs kid choose a 20-21 ounce bat
– For 120-140 lbs kid choose a 21-23 ounce bat
– For 140 lbs or more kid choose a 23-24 ounce bat

4. Drop

A bat’s drop is the difference between its length and weight. The higher the drop number, the lighter the bat. Youth bats are required by law to have a drop of -7 to -13.5 but for a 7-year-old, a drop of -10 to -13 is sufficient.

While the length, width, weight, and drop guidelines given above are safe to work with, you should know that different youth leagues may have varying regulations on bat size. To be 100% sure, consult your league’s policies before you make the final choice.

What Else Matters?

Sure, size is the most important thing, but it is not the only factor to consider. Here are other things that you should put in mind:

The Material

Baseball bats are made of either wood or metal, but wooden bats are mostly used by professional league players. For that reason, pretty much all baseball bats are made of metal, specifically aluminum and its alloys. The material is light enough but very durable and thus the bat should last for a fairly long time.

The League

Different youth leagues have different regulations regarding baseball bats. For instance, most leagues for 7-year-olds require kids to have bats that have 1.15 BPF (Bat Performance Factor), which is a measure of how fast the ball comes off the bat. To be on the safe side, make sure you check all the policies of the league in which your kid plays. In addition to that, be sure to choose a bat that is certified by both USSA and ASA.

The Manufacturer

A renowned manufacturer is bound to offer bats of better quality than a less-known one. In fact, it would be prudent of you to check what other customers are saying about your preferred brand before you purchase it.

Conclusion

As you have noticed, choosing a bat for a 7-year-old is not a walk in the park. Out of all the factors to consider, size is undoubtedly the most important. The length, width, weight, and drop of the bat will determine how suitable it is for your kid. So, measure the height and weight and use the info to determine the most appropriate bat length and weight. As far as width goes, it is safe to settle for a bat with a 2¼-inch barrel. Concerning drop, anything from -10 to -13 is sufficient.

Reply