Buying Guide: 10 Best Tennis Rackets For Beginners

If you are a beginner, you need a tennis racket that will not only make it easy for you to master the game but also make it fun to play. Tennis experts call them “game improvement” rackets because they help novice players to improve their skills. A typical game improvement racket should be light in weight, have an oversize head, and a medium to stiff flex.

Well, that’s a rather vague description, but don’t worry because we have covered all those features (and more) in detail within this guide to choosing the best tennis rackets for beginners. It should act as a reliable blueprint for you, whether you are buying a racket for yourself or someone else. If the seller allows it, be sure to test the racket before you buy it as that will give you firsthand experience of what you are settling for.

Top 10 Best Tennis Rackets For Beginners 2017

* editor rating based on quality and value
MODELOUR RATING
Babolat Nadal 25 Junior Tennis Racquet
Babolat Nadal 25 Junior Tennis Racquet
(4.8 / 5)
Head Instinct Jr 25 Tennis Racquet
Head Instinct Jr 25 Tennis Racquet
(4.8 / 5)
Wilson Essence Tennis Racquet
Wilson Essence Tennis Racquet
(4.9 / 5)
Head Ti.S6 Tennis Racquet
Head Ti.S6 Tennis Racquet
(5 / 5)
Wilson Energy XL Tennis Racquet
Wilson Energy XL Tennis Racquet
(4.7 / 5)
Kansa 271 Tennis Racket For Adults Training
Kansa 271 Tennis Racket For Adults Training
(4.9 / 5)
Wilson Roger Federer Junior Tennis Racquet
Wilson Roger Federer Junior Tennis Racquet
(4.6 / 5)
Wilson Triumph Racket
Wilson Triumph Racket
(4.7 / 5)
Wilson Federer Adult Strung Tennis Racket
Wilson Federer Adult Strung Tennis Racket
(4.7 / 5)
Head Instinct Jr 21 Tennis Racquet
Head Instinct Jr 21 Tennis Racquet
(4.9 / 5)

Best Tennis Rackets for Beginners: Buying Advice

There are so many factors to consider when buying a beginner tennis racket. Here are the main ones:

The Type

Tennis rackets come in three main types that vary depending on the style of play and skill level of the player. Choosing the most appropriate style will certainly help you improve the quality of your game. The mentioned types are:

Control/player’s rackets

As their name suggests, these rackets are built for maximum control. They offer a great balance between maneuverability and power. Despite those benefits, they are totally bad for beginners on account of their small heads that make it hard to hit the ball. As a matter of fact, control rackets are designed for professional players whose focus is mainly control and nothing else, so stay away from these if you are a beginner.

Tweener rackets

These rackets are made for all skill levels and feature an admirable balance between maneuverability, power, and control. That said, they might not be the best for you as a beginner considering you have the option to choose from a wide range of game improvement rackets that are designed with novice players in mind.

Game improvement rackets

Designed strictly for beginners, these rackets feature large heads and lightweight for ease of use. A well-designed game improvement racket will add some power to your shot, and that is something that will go a long way in enhancing your competitive advantage.

So, as far as type goes, every beginner should opt for a game improvement racket.

Length

The typical length of a tennis racket is 27 – 28 inches (or 68.6 – 71.1 cm), but there are some that are as long as 29 inches. If you are using a longer racket, your swing will have more power than if you had a shorter one. However, the downside of the longer one is that it is hard to maneuver and you will find it difficult to aim. Those are two things that you don’t want in your game as a beginner. That is why it is highly recommended that you stick to the normal 27-inch racket.

Still, on the issue of length, the size of the racket’s grip is also a major consideration to put in mind. A proper grip will make it easy for you to control the racket. So can you choose a suitable grip size? Easy, simply measure the length from the top of your middle finger to the middle line of your palm, and that is your grip size. Note that it is better to choose a grip that is small for you than one that is big because you can always tie a tape around a small one to increase its circumference.

The Weight

Compared to heavy ones, light weight rackets usually produce more spin and power on the ball, and those are two things that you want as a beginner because your swing will be fairly slow. You can move to a heavier racket as you develop and master the arts of racket control and power generation.

So how much should a beginner’s racket weigh? Tennis rackets come in three weight categories, the heavy ones that weigh 10.6 to 11.9 ounces, medium weight ones that weigh 9.8 to 10.5 ounces, and light weight rackets that weigh 7.9 to 9.7 ounces. As you might have already guessed, a lightweight racket is the best bet for a beginner so stick to the 7.9 to 9.7 ounces bracket.

Size of the Head

The head of the racket you choose will have a very big influence on your game. A big head will increase your margin of error (when you are hitting the ball), and that means you will have few to no misses. In addition to that, it will generate more power compared to one with a small head.

But just how big should it be? Smaller rackets have a head size of 85 to 94 square inches. Medium ones have a head that measures anything from 95 to 105 square inches while large ones range from 106 to 118 square inches. There are some manufacturers who make oversized rackets whose heads measure as much as 120 to 130 square inches.

You should know that the bigger the head, the better the racket for a beginner. Therefore, as a newbie, you should go for the large and oversized rackets (from 106 all the way to 130 square inches). If you want a challenge, you can try one with 100 square inches, but don’t go below that mark.

The Flex

A racket’s flex refers to how much it flexes when it comes into contact with the tennis ball. A stiff racket will flex less than a flexible one. Now, a racket that flexes a lot will absorb most of the ball’s power, and that will result in energy loss. You will need to swing your racket with so much power and speed to compensate for the lost energy, and that is not something you want (or can do easily) as a beginner. That means your best bet is going for a racket that is stiff.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a comprehensive guide to buying a tennis racket for a beginner. The guidelines will help you make the right choice. Remember that a game improvement racket is designed strictly for beginners and that a normal 27-inch long racket is the most recommendable. As far as head size and flex go, choose a racket that has a large or oversized head coupled with a stiff flex. That combination will increase your margin of error while at the same time adding power to your shots.

Reply