Guide: Best Youth Ice Hockey Skates 2017 – 2018

ice hockey skates

Like many things, you get what you pay for when it comes to ice hockey skates. The sport itself is fast-paced, and you need a sturdy skate as well as a very good boot with a strong holder to keep it all in place. The player is standing, or moving fast, on a one-eighth inch blade of metal, so you need something that will support the player and allow them to have balance.

 

Higher priced skates don’t just look nicer, they generally are of a higher quality as well. Even so, you still need to consider the level of play and what your goals are. If a junior is just trying out the sport to see if he or she likes it, then a less expensive pair might be best. If your child has been playing a year or two and is committed, a more expensive brand might be the best idea.

Top 10 Best Junior Ice Hockey Skates (2017)

* editor rating based on quality and value
MODELOUR RATING
Bauer Supreme 190 Youth Ice Skates
Bauer Supreme 190 Youth Ice Skates
4.9 out of 5 stars (4.9 / 5)
Bauer Youth Supreme 140 Skate
Bauer Youth Supreme 140 Skate
4.7 out of 5 stars (4.7 / 5)
Bauer Youth Vapor X300 Skate
Bauer Youth Vapor X300 Skate
5 out of 5 stars (5 / 5)
CCM Jet Speed 250 Youth Ice Hockey Skates
CCM Jet Speed 250 Youth Ice Hockey Skates
4.9 out of 5 stars (4.9 / 5)
Bauer Vapor X 60 Junior Hockey Skate
Bauer Vapor X 60 Junior Hockey Skate
4.4 out of 5 stars (4.4 / 5)
Bauer Supreme S160 Youth Ice Hockey Skates
Bauer Supreme S160 Youth Ice Hockey Skates
4.8 out of 5 stars (4.8 / 5)
Bauer Junior Supreme 140 Skate
Bauer Junior Supreme 140 Skate
4.6 out of 5 stars (4.6 / 5)
Bauer Junior Vapor X200 Skate
Bauer Junior Vapor X200 Skate
5 out of 5 stars (5 / 5)
Bauer LIL Angel Champ Skates
Bauer LIL Angel Champ Skates
4.2 out of 5 stars (4.2 / 5)
CCM RBZ 40 Youth Ice Hockey Skates
CCM RBZ 40 Youth Ice Hockey Skates
4.8 out of 5 stars (4.8 / 5)

Types of Skates

When you get beyond basic rental ice skate you use at a public skating area, the skates get specialized quickly. Hockey skates have extra padding for protection, and the blade is built for quick stops and starts. Other types of skates – figure, recreational, speed, roller, – all have special design features designed for that activity.

Beginners

A properly fitting pair of shoes is essential for any ice hockey player, and especially for the beginner. Wearing skates that don’t fit well can cause what is called “Haglund’s Deformity” or the “Bauer Bump.” This is a common foot injury for hockey players, and the chances of getting it are lessened with the right shoe. If you want to spend the money, you can get skates made at a pro shop where the skates can be baked to fit your child’s feet, but there are less costly options out there that are good.

One important thing to realize is that sizes are different for ice hockey skates than for regular shoes. A general rule of thumb is to get the skate boots one to two sizes smaller than what is normally worn.

Thin socks should be worn when trying on the skates. The heel should fit tightly into the back, and the widest part of the foot should feel almost tight, but not to the point of being uncomfortable. The toe should have a very small amount of room in front of the boot. A very tight fit, but not too tight, is essential. Youth players need a more flexible boot, but higher level players use very stiff boots that are very expensive.

A beginner needs a decent skate with a good basic boot. They do not need the special construction of advanced skates, though. When getting a shoe, get the one that offers the most protection and the one that fits the best. Everyone is different, and a tiny difference in a pair of boots can make a huge difference.

New or Used

There is the option of used boots, as opposed to new ones. The beginner needs a decent skate, but probably will be fine with a used one. Skates are expensive and kids’ feet grow quickly, so you could be shelling out a few hundred dollars every year on new skates. It might make more sense to get used ones each year as the child grow. If you can find a skate in good shape and fits well, it will be serviceable until the child outgrows the boot.

If you are going to get used skates, be careful to examine the condition. The blade and the boot. There is also the holder for the blade, but many people see that as part of the blade. If the boot is too worn, it won’t protect your child’s foot enough, and may not last the season. Also, check the blade to make sure it can be sharpened during the season.

Competitive Skates

Skates for playing ice hockey are very specialized. There is no need to get them or spend the extra money if you are not going to be competing. It is important to choose quality skates, because they do determine how successful you will, or will not be, on the ice. If you get beyond the beginner level and want to play at a higher level, you will have to get a higher level skate.

Some of the extras you get with high-end competitive skates include:

  • Light materials to allow speed and movement, while still providing protection
  • Durable construction.
  • Thermo-formable padding, which can be baked to create a custom fit.
  • Increased ankle supports and more stiffness.
  • Extra padding.
  • The precise workmanship on the blade.

The above is for high-level skaters who do need all the extra trappings. There are also recreational hockey skates that still offer protection and are sturdy, but not as much. Manufacturers have many different levels of skates to choose from, and a pro shop can help you decide what is best.

Regardless of style, construction, price or anything else, the most important thing is to find the best fitting shoe for your child to play on.

Buying Guide: Best Roller & Inline Hockey Skates for Youth

roller hockey skates

When it comes to your children, putting their safety and comfort is high on the list of priorities for parents when they prepare for extracurricular activities. Why should shopping for their first pair of roller hockey skates be any different? In fact, roller hockey may be the first sport that you have allowed your child to participate in. With all the types of roller hockey skates on the market today, don’t let choosing the perfect pair of skates be intimidating.

Here are some important tips to keep in mind when buying new roller hockey skates for them.

Top 10 Best Junior Roller Hockey Skates for Youth (2017)

*editor rating based on quality and value
MODELOUR RATING
Bauer Vapor X300 Inline Skates
Bauer Vapor X300 Junior Inline Skates
4.6 out of 5 stars (4.6 / 5)
Tour Hockey Fb-225 Youth Inline Hockey Skates
Tour Hockey Fb-225 Youth Inline Hockey Skates
4.1 out of 5 stars (4.1 / 5)
Tour Pro Fish Boneline Youth Inline Hockey Skates
Tour Pro Fish Boneline Youth Inline Hockey Skates
4.8 out of 5 stars (4.8 / 5)
Bauer Junior Vapor X400R Roller Hockey Skate
Bauer Junior Vapor X400R Roller Hockey Skate
4.1 out of 5 stars (4.1 / 5)
Tour Hockey Fb-225 Junior Inline Hockey Skates
Tour Hockey Fb-225 Junior Inline Hockey Skates
4.9 out of 5 stars (4.9 / 5)
CCM RBZ60 JR Kids Inline Hockey Skates
CCM RBZ60 JR Kids Inline Hockey Skates
4.8 out of 5 stars (4.8 / 5)
Bauer Junior Vapor X500R Roller Hockey Skate
Bauer Junior Vapor X500R Roller Hockey Skate
4.9 out of 5 stars (4.9 / 5)
Alkali RPD Lite Adjustable Inline Skates
Alkali RPD Lite Adjustable Inline Skates
4.6 out of 5 stars (4.6 / 5)
Mission Inhaler DS:7 Junior Inline Hockey Skates
Mission Inhaler DS:7 Junior Inline Hockey Skates
4.8 out of 5 stars (4.8 / 5)
Bladerunner Youth Dynamo Adjustable Hockey Skate with 72mm Wheels
Bladerunner Youth Dynamo Adjustable Hockey Skate
4.9 out of 5 stars (4.9 / 5)

What To Consider Before Buying

The first point to consider before even going to the store is what position your child will play, goalie or field. Both positions require a different style of skate with features that are specific to the position.

  • Standard roller hockey skates come with a soft boot, since flexibility is a key component in moving.
  • A goalie skate will have a shorter tongue and ankle cut in order to allow the leg pads to be the sole protector of the legs. The wheel makeup is different too, since the goalie will rush off with three front wheels.

Comfort Is Everything

It is every parent’s hope that their child will see more playing time than bench time, but if the skate is not comfortable, your child may make a choice to sit on the bench way before the coach does. It is best to have your child try the skates on in the store to see which liner material feels best. Since most roller hockey players play without socks, try them on with bare feet, so your child can get a feel for how they will be during practice and games.

Choose a skate with a boot that is not stiff to give your child freedom of movement.

It is also important to note that a skate size will typically be one size less than your child’s actual shoe size.

Obey The Speed Limit Of A Beginner Player

The skate’s overall makeup affects the speed, which varies between beginner to advanced levels. Since your child is new at the sport, it is important not to rush into the assumption that the fastest skates need to be worn, so your child can be the best on the team.

There’s plenty of time for that! At this stage, your child is still learning the rules of the game, which include how to move about in the skates. A slow speed skate will help your child be able to focus more on the game and worry less about falling, as the fundamentals of keeping balance are learned, which will also make your child less prone to injury.

One of the most important aspects of roller hockey is getting a good stop. For this, wheel size and style will matter.

Some field skates have two wheels that are a different size than the other two to allow for this. I’m you couple that feature with a boot that is not stiff, your child will be less likely to be injured in a sudden turn or stop. Also, the lower the bearing number, the less fast the skate will be. The lower numbers are good to start out with, and you can buy skates with higher bearings as your child gains more experience.

The first pair of skates is a choice that must be made between the parent and child in order to have the correct balance of speed and comfort when the skates truly begin to be put to the test on the rink. Whether your child lasts for one season or eventually turns into a professional hockey player, no decision will be as important as his first skates.